Amy Cuddy, social psychologist, author, and speaker, is an expert on the behavioral science of power, presence, purpose, and prejudice. Amy has been a professor at Harvard Business School and Northwestern University, and is currently a researcher and Lecturer on Psychology at Harvard University. Her 2015 NYT bestselling book, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges (Little, Brown & Co.), is published in 29 languages. As described in the NYT Book Review, “Presence feels at once concrete and inspiring, simple but ambitious--above all, truly powerful.” Her 2012 TED Talk, ‘Your Body Language May Shape Who You Are’, is the second-most watched in TED’s history, with over 40 million views. Using experimental and correlational methods, she studies nonverbal behavior; prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination; and the roles of power, purpose, and authenticity in shaping people’s personal and professional wellbeing. Her research has been published in top academic journals and covered by the BBC, NPR, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Economist, Guardian, and more. Cuddy has been named a Game Changer by Time, a Rising Star by the Association for Psychological Science, one of 50 Women Who Are Changing the World by Business Insider, and a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum.

Jack Schultz has spent the last six years studying the effects of psychological and behavioral interventions on mood, performance, and well-being. Jack was a Research Associate at Harvard Business School, where he directed research for the Cuddy Lab. He has also supported research projects with the Harvard Decision Science Lab as an undergraduate IQSS scholar, the Edmond J. Safra Research Lab in the Harvard’s Safra Center for Ethics, and the Gilbert Lab with Harvard social psychologist Dan Gilbert. Before moving into academic research, Jack worked on grand-jury cases in Health Care Fraud for the Department of Justice. His research interests include understanding how to measure, facilitate, and activate best-selves at individual and societal levels. He is a participating member of Code for Boston, an organization of volunteer researchers, data scientists, and citizens who leverage technology to address civic issues. Throughout his career Jack has sought creative technical solutions to social issues.